St. Ignatius Pastorate Plan Unveiled

St. Ignatius in Baltimore recently completed its pastorate plan. In the pastorate’s e-zine, Parish: ‘the thought,’ Fr. Jim Casciotti shared an abbreviated version of the plan, which highlights the vision, sacred purpose (mission), guiding principles, and goals, as well as the priority strategies the parish will focus on first and ways parishioners can get involved. The plan is the result of a year’s worth of prayer, discussion, and discernment that included the focused work of a planning team, as well as broader input from the parish as a whole. To read Fr. Casciotti’s introduction and link to the plan, click here.

2019 Cohort Announced for Pastorate Planning

In early July, ten pastorates became the 2019 Cohort, activated to engage in intentional, evangelization-based pastorate planning in the coming year. This will be the third cohort to enter into this graced time of prayer, reflection, conversation, and discernment about the ways in which Christ’s saving love might be made known more profoundly – in this time and in these places.
The 2019 Cohort pastorates are:

  • St. Peter (Hancock) (Fr. Jack Lombardi, pastor)
  • St. John (Columbia) (Fr. Gerry Bowen, pastor)
  • Our Lady of Victory (Fr. John Rapisarda, pastor)
  • St. Philip Neri – St. Clement (Fr. Michael DeAscanis, pastor)
  • Holy Family (Randallstown) (Fr. Ray Harris, pastor)
  • St. Michael – St. Clement Mary Hofbauer – Annunciation (Friar Tim Dore, pastor)
  • St. John (Hydes) (Fr. Pete Literal, pastor)
  • St. Andrew by the Bay (Fr. Jeff Dauses, pastor)
  • St. Wenceslaus – St. Ann – St. Francis Xavier (Rev. Xavier Edet, S.S.J., pastor)
  • St. Leo (Fr. Bernie Carman, S.A.C., pastor)

Redesigned Be Missionary Disciples Website Launched; New Tool for Missionary Discipleship Available

The Be Missionary Disciples website (www.BeMissionaryDisciples.org) has been updated and redesigned. With two pastorate phases already activated and another one just getting started, the updated content captures not only the work that is being undertaken and the fruit that is being produced from this work, but also places a stronger emphasis on the Gospel-inspired priorities that underpin this work.

We call these priorities the Core Mission Priorities – the six areas within which each pastorate should be examining their missionary impulse to know and make known the name of our Savior, Jesus Christ. Click here to go directly to the Core Mission Priorities page and download a copy of the new workbook, a tool designed for facilitated or self-guided reflection and discernment on the Core Mission Priorities.

Four-Part Update on Pastorate Planning Now Available!

With the Pilot Phase (2017 Cohort) and Phase IA (2018 Cohort) pastorates’ planning work completed or well on its way, a four-part update on the experience so far has been compiled. The series reminds us of the reasons why Be Missionary Disciples is being undertaken, summarizes the work being done and some of the lessons learned along the way, and answers some frequently asked questions about pastorate planning. Click below to view or download the series, or go to the Planning tab on the website for additional detail about all of these topics and more!

Mission Matters: July 17, 2018

This week’s “Parish Table Talk”: Equip for Ministry – Hispanic Pastoral Formation – update; Msgr. O’Dwyer 55th Annual Golf Tournament; Volunteers Needed for Holy Innocents Ministry Read more

Mission Matters: June 19, 2018

This week’s “Parish Table Talk”: Religious Freedom week; Cardinal Turkson’s visit to Basilica Read more

Mission Matters: June 5, 2018

This week’s “Parish Table Talk”: V Encuentro testimony videos; Video tools for understanding Missionary Discipleship and Evangelization Read more

Mission Matters: May 22, 2018

This week’s “Parish Table Talk”: Equip Lay Ministry Formation Program for Hispanic Community; Young Adult Ministry Summit in DC; Reminder about Spanish Missal training and Diaconate Ordinations; A Quiet Place Movie Review – surprising religious themes Read more

Mission Matters: May 8, 2018

This week’s “Parish Table Talk”: Office of Divine Worship – Important Dates; Pontifical High Mass in the Extraordinary Form in DC Read more

Mission Matters: April 24, 2018

This week’s “Parish Table Talk”: Gaudete et Exsultate; 2018 ChristLife National Conference Read more

Mission Matters: April 10, 2018

This week’s “Parish Table Talk”: Reminder – Ecumenical and Interfaith Prayer Service with Archbishop Lori; Why ChristLife Matters?; Word on Fire Community; Project Rachel Baltimore Retreat Read more

Christ is Risen! He is Risen Indeed.

Five years ago, the Holy Father sent an Easter message to Rome and to the World. It is a message of hope. It is a message of love. It is a message for you. Happy, blessed season of Easter!

Dear brothers and sisters in Rome and throughout the world, Happy Easter!

What a joy it is for me to announce this message: Christ is risen! I would like it to go out to every house and every family, especially where the suffering is greatest, in hospitals, in prisons…

Most of all, I would like it to enter every heart, for it is there that God wants to sow this Good News: Jesus is risen, there is hope for you, you are no longer in the power of sin, of evil! Love has triumphed, mercy has been victorious!

We too, like the women who were Jesus’ disciples, who went to the tomb and found it empty, may wonder what this event means (cf. Lk 24:4). What does it mean that Jesus is risen? It means that the love of God is stronger than evil and death itself; it means that the love of God can transform our lives and let those desert places in our hearts bloom.

This same love for which the Son of God became man and followed the way of humility and self-giving to the very end, down to hell – to the abyss of separation from God – this same merciful love has flooded with light the dead body of Jesus and transfigured it, has made it pass into eternal life. Jesus did not return to his former life, to earthly life, but entered into the glorious life of God and he entered there with our humanity, opening us to a future of hope.

This is what Easter is: it is the exodus, the passage of human beings from slavery to sin and evil to the freedom of love and goodness. Because God is life, life alone, and his glory is the living man (cf. Irenaeus, Adversus Haereses, 4,20,5-7).

Dear brothers and sisters, Christ died and rose once for all, and for everyone, but the power of the Resurrection, this passover from slavery to evil to the freedom of goodness, must be accomplished in every age, in our concrete existence, in our everyday lives. How many deserts, even today, do human beings need to cross! Above all, the desert within, when we have no love for God or neighbor, when we fail to realize that we are guardians of all that the Creator has given us and continues to give us. God’s mercy can make even the driest land become a garden, can restore life to dry bones (cf. Ez 37:1-14).

So this is the invitation which I address to everyone: Let us accept the grace of Christ’s Resurrection! Let us be renewed by God’s mercy, let us be loved by Jesus, let us enable the power of his love to transform our lives too; and let us become agents of this mercy, channels through which God can water the earth, protect all creation and make justice and peace flourish.

And so we ask the risen Jesus, who turns death into life, to change hatred into love, vengeance into forgiveness, war into peace. Yes, Christ is our peace, and through him we implore peace for all the world.

Peace for the Middle East, and particularly between Israelis and Palestinians, who struggle to find the road of agreement, that they may willingly and courageously resume negotiations to end a conflict that has lasted all too long. Peace in Iraq, that every act of violence may end, and above all for dear Syria, for its people torn by conflict and for the many refugees who await help and comfort. How much blood has been shed! And how much suffering must there still be before a political solution to the crisis will be found?

Peace for Africa, still the scene of violent conflicts. In Mali, may unity and stability be restored; in Nigeria, where attacks sadly continue, gravely threatening the lives of many innocent people, and where great numbers of persons, including children, are held hostage by terrorist groups. Peace in the East of the Democratic Republic of Congo, and in the Central African Republic, where many have been forced to leave their homes and continue to live in fear.

Peace in Asia, above all on the Korean peninsula: may disagreements be overcome and a renewed spirit of reconciliation grow.

Peace in the whole world, still divided by greed looking for easy gain, wounded by the selfishness which threatens human life and the family, selfishness that continues in human trafficking, the most extensive form of slavery in this twenty-first century. Peace to the whole world, torn apart by violence linked to drug trafficking and by the iniquitous exploitation of natural resources! Peace to this our Earth! Made the risen Jesus bring comfort to the victims of natural disasters and make us responsible guardians of creation.

Dear brothers and sisters, to all of you who are listening to me, from Rome and from all over of the world, I address the invitation of the Psalm: “Give thanks to the Lord for he is good; for his steadfast love endures forever. Let Israel say: ‘His steadfast love endures forever’” (Ps 117:1-2).